ECN Forum

Erosion Control Network Forum
Welcome to ECN Forum Sign in | Join | Help
in Search
Home
About
Links
Resources
Advertising
Contact
Field Journals
Forums

Browse by Tags

All Tags » Hydrostraw
Showing page 1 of 2 (16 total posts)
  • Hydrostraw's Social Networking Sites

    Facebook:http://www.facebook.com/pages/Manteno-IL/Hydrostraw-LLC/49246007967/Twitter:http://www.twitter.com/hydrostraw YouTube:http://www.youtube.com/user/HydroStraw    
    Posted to Social Networking (Forum) by staylor3 on February 12, 2010
  • The Effect of Surface Roughness on Soil Erosion

    IntroductionIt should come as no surprise to those working in the erosion control field that a roughened soil surface is much less erodible than a smooth, rolled or compacted surface. This is because a roughened surface slows down the velocity of runoff water and increases infiltration, reducing the volume of sediment-laden runoff as well. ...
    Posted to White Papers (Forum) by mikeharding on February 4, 2010
  • Hydraulic mulching application rates change as slope gradient increases

    Myth: Hydraulic mulching application rates change as slope gradient increases. Point of View: In recent months there has appeared on some product packaging recommendations for hydraulic mulch application rates based on gradient of slope. For example, one manufacturer provides the following departures from a standard 3,000 lbs per acre application ...
    Posted to White Papers (Forum) by mikeharding on February 4, 2010
  • Rolled Erosion Control Products (RECPs) specification based on slope gradient

    Myth: Rolled Erosion Control Products (RECPs) specification based on slope gradient. Point of View: Diagrams have been drawn and specifications written that recommend the use of various rolled erosion control products based solely on slope gradient. These unsupported recommendations were made by blanket manufacturers nearly two decades ago. This ...
    Posted to White Papers (Forum) by mikeharding on February 4, 2010
  • Effects on Post Fire Revegetation

    Myth:Post-fire remediation actions, specifically hydraulic mulching and seeding, have a detrimental impact on the re-establishment of natural plant communities in California. Point of View: One of the first questions asked following an urban wildfire is whether or not to seed hillsides left barren by the fire and subject to erosion. Prior to 1993, ...
    Posted to White Papers (Forum) by mikeharding on February 4, 2010
  • Perception After a Wildfire

    Myth: Post-fire remediation actions, specifically hydraulic mulching and seeding, are costly to implement on the large areas affected by wildfires and are not effective in controlling erosion. Point of View: There is the perception that after a wildfire, erosion and sediment control measures are implemented over the entire burn area, making ...
    Posted to White Papers (Forum) by mikeharding on February 4, 2010
  • Slope Measurement and Area Estimation for Hydraulic Applications

    THE SLOPE GRADIENT FACTORFig. 1. Burned slopes above Pala Mesa Resort in Fallbrook, CA in 2007. The area to be treated was estimated using a combination of aerial photographs and topographic maps.For determining square footage of an area to be treated with hydraulic mulch, slope length and width can be determined using a measuring tape or wheel… ...
    Posted to White Papers (Forum) by mikeharding on February 4, 2010
  • Slope Inclination Conversion Table

    We all tend to describe the steepness of slopes in different ways. Some of the most common descriptors are:       1. Degree of inclination (i.e., 26.87°, 18.43°, etc.)       2. Percentage of vertical rise over horizontal run (i.e., 50%, 33.3%, ...
    Posted to White Papers (Forum) by mikeharding on February 4, 2010
  • The Effect of Surface Roughness on Soil Erosion

    IntroductionIt should come as no surprise to those working in the erosion control field that a roughened soil surface is much less erodible than a smooth, rolled or compacted surface. This is because a roughened surface slows down the velocity of runoff water and increases infiltration, reducing the volume of sediment-laden runoff as well. ...
    Posted to Erosion Control Information (Forum) by mikeharding on February 4, 2010
1 2 Next >
proud member of:
Erosion control technology council International Association of Hydroseeding Professionals IECA Member PLANET, professional landcare network
3676 W. 9000N Rd.
Manteno, Illinois 60950
1-800-914-8182
info@erosioncontrolnetwork.com

legal | privacy | intranet